NEAS QUALITY FRAMEWORK

NEAS QUALITY ASSURANCE FRAMEWORK

© NEAS 2020 VERSION 5.0

The NEAS QA Framework has been developed through extensive consultation with the English language teaching (ELT) profession in Australia and overseas, industry bodies and government.

Review is undertaken in response to changes and developments in the field, with changes implemented only after wide consultation.

The purpose of the NEAS QA Framework is to:

  • Establish and uphold high standards within the ELT industry
  • Support organisations and individuals in demonstrating quality in their programs, products
  • and services
  • Provide guidance to organisations and individuals in their continuous improvement processes
  • Promote recognition of quality organisations and individuals

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Within each Quality Area, there are:

  • Quality Principles, which identify salient aspects of quality within each Quality Area. Each Quality Principle is supported by
  • Quality Drivers, which identify the key elements of the Quality Principles to be addressed by endorsed organisations, individuals or products and services in demonstrating quality. Quality Drivers express important aspects of quality, but should not be considered mandatory.

Some Quality Drivers may not be relevant in certain contexts. For instance, Quality Drivers relating to the student experience are likely to be less relevant in offshore Centres catering to domestic students.

NEAS Quality Endorsed organisations, individuals and products and services demonstrate quality practice in all relevant Quality Areas, guided by the Quality Principles delineated in each. Depending on the nature of the organisation’s or individual’s operations, some Quality Areas may not be relevant.

1. Within this document, the term “Centre” is used to refer to all forms of ELT provider, including independent English language schools, colleges and centres, as well as English language centres located within schools, VET providers, Higher Education providers and universities and Online providers.

Legislative and Regulatory Compliance

Essential to NEAS Quality Endorsement is compliance with legislative and regulatory requirements. NEAS Quality Endorsed Centres, for example ensure that:

  • All staff are informed of legislation relevant to the Centre and to their statement of duties, and they understand its application to their own responsibilities
  • Students are aware of their rights and obligations
  • Contracts and agreements with service providers, including but not limited to, education agents and homestay providers, make clear all legislative obligations and ensure that
  • checks are conducted as required under law
  • Systematic review processes are in place to monitor compliance and to incorporate legislative or regulatory changes.

Failure to abide by legislative and regulatory requirements or the NEAS Quality Principles may result in suspension or termination of the Centre’s Quality Endorsed status.

In order to receive and maintain NEAS Quality Endorsement, ELT Centres are required to confirm their compliance with all relevant laws and regulations by submitting proof of registration with relevant regulatory authorities, with no outstanding matters under consideration.

Mapping of regulatory standards

NEAS Quality Principles have been mapped against related requirements of the National Code of Practice 2018 (NCP) and the ELICOS Standards 2018 (ES).

It should be noted that mapping indicates those areas covered by a NEAS Quality Principle which are also addressed by a regulatory standard. While this mapping identifies areas in common, providers should be aware of differences between what is required under regulation and what may be recommended in the interests of quality.

The Quality Improvement Cycle

Essential to NEAS Quality Endorsement is a commitment to continuously improving quality. Feedback on all aspects of the Centre’s operations is systematically sought from all stakeholders and integrated into its quality improvement cycle.

QUALITY AREA A: TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

QUALITY PRINCIPLE A1: Course design supports quality learning outcomes.

A1.1 Courses are designed to meet student learning needs, goals and interests.

A1.2 Course design is informed by developments in language teaching methodology and technology.

A1.3 Each course has specific objectives which are achieved through detailed learning outcomes.

A1.4 Student achievement is measured through validated assessment instruments mapped to course learning outcomes, to ensure assessment is valid, reliable, fair and flexible.

A1.5 Assessment is moderated to ensure consistency of assessment judgement.

A1.6 Syllabus documents provide effective guidance for teachers, in lesson and assessment planning and delivery, to meet course objectives.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE A2: Teachers have appropriate training and experience for the courses they deliver and assess.

A2.1 Teachers hold the following minimum qualifications:

  • a recognised degree or equivalent
  • a recognised TESOL qualification

A2.2 Teachers are allocated to levels and courses based on their experience and training.

A2.3 Teachers plan lessons and activities appropriate to the course learning outcomes and the needs of students.

A2.4 Teaching strategies are appropriate to the objectives and level of each course.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE A3: Students are enrolled in courses and levels that reflect their language proficiency and learning goals.

A3.1 The range of courses offered is appropriate to the profile of students enrolled.

A3.2 The Centre has effective procedures for assessing each student’s capability to undertake a particular course and for placing students in appropriate classes.

A3.3 There is regular and formal provision for students to demonstrate their ability to progress to a higher level or different course.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE A4: Course delivery, assessment and teaching approaches optimise outcomes for students.

A4.1 Lessons are student-centred to maximise engagement and ensure a positive learning atmosphere.

A4.2 Assessment policies and procedures provide for both formative and summative assessment.

A4.3 Where an ELICOS course is accepted for direct entry into a tertiary education course, assessment outcomes are formally benchmarked against relevant tertiary education admission criteria.

A4.4 Teachers select teaching and assessment resources relevant to student needs, goals and interests.

A4.5 Teachers use feedback and correction techniques that maximise student learning and participation.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE A5: Students are encouraged to take control of their language learning.

A5.1 Language learning strategies which encourage student autonomy are embedded in course design.

A5.2 Students receive regular feedback on their progress in relation to course objectives and learning outcomes.

A5.3 Students are inducted into the effective use of self-paced study resources offered by the Centre.

A5.4 Students are provided with opportunities to discuss their learning goals and pathways with an appropriately trained member of staff.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE A6: Evaluation of courses is regular and rigorous.

A6.1 Analysis of student achievement of learning outcomes informs course review and the frequency of the review cycle.

A6.2 Validation and moderation of assessment instruments contribute to the course review process.

A6.3 Teaching records are retained for purposes of verification, program coordination and course review.

A6.4 Student satisfaction feedback contributes to the quality review and improvement cycle.

A6.5 Student results in external examinations and/or further study contribute to the quality review and improvement cycle.

A6.6 Students are encouraged to participate in sector-wide benchmarking activities to provide satisfaction data beyond the Centre’s internal evaluation processes.

Area A notes

QUALITY AREA B: THE STUDENT EXPERIENCE

QUALITY PRINCIPLE B1: The application and enrolment process is clear and easy to follow for students and agents.

B1.1 Admission procedures are implemented by trained staff.

B1.2 Government regulations are well understood and readily explained to students by admissions staff.

B1.3 Provision is made for enquiries and enrolments originating from a range of channels.

B1.4 A regular review mechanism is in place to ensure admission procedures and related documents are updated in line with changes to regulatory requirements.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE B2: Students have the information and support needed to adjust to living and studying in this country.

B2.1 Provision is made for the well-being and welfare of students, relevant to their personal and cultural backgrounds and the Centre’s location.

B2.2 Students are provided with an orientation program on arrival.

B2.3 Students are well informed as to how to act safely and seek help as needed inside and outside the Centre.

B2.4 Students under the age of 18 are provided with appropriate support services.

B2.5 Students can readily access assistance to locate and arrange suitable accommodation.

B2.6 Where a student support service is outsourced, effective processes are in place to ensure the quality of the service provided.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE B3: Students are provided with support to be actively involved in their learning program.

B3.1 Students are made aware of course objectives, expectations, requirements and learning outcomes.

B3.2 All students receive appropriate levels of service and support regardless of the timetabling of their classes.

B3.3 Students are provided with opportunities to extend their language learning outside the classroom.

B3.4 Provision is made to support those students who wish to further their education in English.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE B4: Stakeholder feedback is routinely integrated into the Centre’s processes designed to enhance the student experience.

B4.1 Stakeholder feedback is used to evaluate programs and services and is incorporated into planning and improvement of courses and services.

B4.2 Complaint handling demonstrates a transparent commitment to resolving problems and improving relationships, programs and services.

B4.3 Complaints are reviewed as part of the quality improvement cycle.

Area B notes

QUALITY AREA C: RESOURCES AND FACILITIES

QUALITY PRINCIPLE C1: The Centre’s premises reflect a professional workplace.

C1.1 The Centre has appropriate signage.

C1.2 All areas are kept in a safe, clean and hygienic condition.

C1.3 All areas are fitted out and furnished in accordance with their use.

C1.4 Reception areas are appropriately staffed.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE C2: Teaching and study spaces facilitate language learning.

C2.1 Teaching spaces are conducive to studying for extended periods.

C2.2 Design of the teaching spaces promotes student engagement with learning.

C2.3 Teaching spaces are appropriately furnished and equipped for language learning.

C2.4 Teaching spaces and additional study areas reflect and support a language learning environment.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE C3: Student facilities and services foster community.

C3.1 The condition, furnishing and layout of student common areas promote and support student interaction.

C3.2 Students are provided with information regarding the purchase and consumption of food in close proximity to the Centre.

C3.3 Information is provided about available social and recreational activities suited to students’ ages and cultural backgrounds.

C3.4 Students are provided with means of sharing information relevant to them.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE C4: The Centre has resources for each course to meet a range of student learning needs, styles and preferences.

C4.1 Each course syllabus includes a range of suggested teaching and learning resources, which are available within the Centre.

C4.2 Teaching and learning resources meet a range of learning needs, styles and preferences.

C4.3 Students have ready access to a range of appropriate resources to support self-directed learning outside scheduled course hours.

C4.4 Assessment resources provide opportunities for students to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes through different methods of assessment.

C4.5 Teaching and learning resources are allocated so as to avoid inappropriate duplication of materials across courses and levels and to maximise efficiencies.

C4.6 Resources are regularly monitored and updated to reflect industry best practice and currency.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE C5: Teachers have access to space and resources to create classroom learning materials to meet student needs.

C5.1 There is a budget for investment in resources and development of teaching materials.

C5.2 Teachers have the opportunity to facilitate innovation in resource development.

C5.3 The design of work space for teachers supports development of materials.

C5.4 Innovation in resource design and development is captured for ongoing integration into future resource development.

Area C Notes

QUALITY AREA D: ADMINISTRATION, MANAGEMENT AND STAFFING

QUALITY PRINCIPLE D1: The Centre has an organisational structure that effectively supports the provision of services to students.

D1.1 Reporting lines in the organisational structure support the efficient delivery of services.

D1.2 Management is familiar with the international education environment.

D1.3 The organisational structure supports the educational goals and welfare of students.

D1.4 All aspects of the Centre’s operations are supported by documented policies with clearly articulated procedures to facilitate their implementation.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE D2: The Centre recruits staff to meet regulatory requirements as well as the identified needs of the organisation.

D2.1 Documented recruitment policy and procedures are informed by the Centre’s strategic plan.

D2.2 The senior leadership team holds the following minimum qualifications and experience:

  • a recognised degree or equivalent
  • a TESOL qualification at postgraduate diploma level
  • a robust knowledge of and experience in English language teaching
  • experience in leading and managing people

D2.3 Each staff member has a signed statement setting out the terms and conditions of their employment, and a position description and/or statement of duties.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE D3: The Centre utilises effective systems for the dissemination of information to stakeholders.

D3.1 Communication with stakeholders is considered and approved through formal guidelines.

D3.2 Staff and students receive information from the Centre through various channels.

D3.3 A formal induction process provides new staff with essential information about the Centre and its operations.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE D4: The Centre supports a performance and development culture for all staff.

D4.1 Staff performance and development processes occur in a cycle which provides a structure for appraising performance, and developing and refining practice.

D4.2 An established culture of sharing contributes to innovation and best practice.

D4.3 Staff are supported in working towards their professional goals through access to opportunities for development.

D4.4 Professional development is aligned with the Centre’s strategic goals.

D4.5 Innovation and best practice are recognised and captured through a structured process.

Area D Notes

QUALITY AREA E: PROMOTION AND STUDENT RECRUITMENT

QUALITY PRINCIPLE E1: Promotional material is ethical, accurate and consistent.

E1.1 Accurate information about the Centre and its products and services is readily accessible to all stakeholders.

E1.2 There is an effective procedure to maintain consistency and currency of information.

E1.3 Courses and services which are restricted to certain groups of students are easily identifiable.

E1.4 Stakeholder feedback is integrated into the Centre’s quality review and improvement cycle.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE E2: Essential information about the Centre is readily accessible.

E2.1 Promotional information is provided in plain language and images used are clear and relevant.

E2.2 Support is available to assist relevant stakeholders with translation of key policies and information.

E2.3 Web links for relevant information and assistance are clearly indicated and explained on the Centre’s website.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE E3: All staff are involved in promoting the Centre.

E3.1 Staff are actively involved in building the Centre’s reputation and brand equity.

E3.2 Staff are given strategies for building relationships with students and other stakeholders.

E3.3 Changes to policies, procedures and services are clearly communicated to staff.

E3.4 Staff are an effective conduit of information to students.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE E4: The Centre makes explicit its quality assurance commitment.

E4.1 NEAS Quality Endorsement is appropriately displayed using the NEAS logo.

E4.2 NEAS Quality Endorsement can be clearly explained by staff.

E4.3 The Centre’s commitment to quality assurance and continuous improvement is identified in promotional material.

Area E Notes

QUALITY AREA F: WELFARE OF STUDENTS AGED UNDER 18 YEARS

NOTE:

  • Providers should be aware that legislative and regulatory requirements vary in different jurisdictions. Providers with ELT Centres in different countries, States or Territories should ensure that each Centre meets local requirements.

KEY TERMS:

  • In Quality Area F, “student” is used to refer to a student under the age of 18.
  • As in Quality Areas A-E, “Centre” refers to any ELICOS provider, including schools.
  • “Minor” is defined as an individual who is under the age of 18 years (Interpretation Act 1987)


QUALITY PRINCIPLE F1: Arrangements are in place to facilitate the student’s safe and efficient recruitment, transit and reception arrangements.

F1.1 The Centre communicates to education agents the legal requirements, contractual obligations and service expectations regarding the transport of students and the kinds of support required for students and parents.

F1.2 The Centre informs students, agents, parents and/or guardians about the Centre and classroom environment, including student age range, to enable an informed decision to be made about enrolling.

F1.3 Comprehensive and Centre-specific information about living and studying in Australia is provided to students, agents, parents, guardians and/or carers to help facilitate the transition required by students and their families.

F1.4 The Centre ensures that an appropriate airport meeting service is provided.

F1.5 Student contact with parents on arrival is facilitated by the Centre.

F1.6 Arrangements are in place to ensure that the student is transported to and from the Centre on their first day of attendance.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE F2: An accommodation service is provided relevant to student needs.

F2.1 Accommodation is available in homestay or on-site boarding facilities suitable to the student’s age, gender and culture.

F2.2 Full information about accommodation options is provided to students, agents, parents and/or guardians at the time of recruitment.

F2.3 Adults with whom the student comes into regular contact in the accommodation have current child protection screening relevant to the jurisdiction.

F2.4 Accommodation providers are made aware of the Centre’s requirements and expectations for the physical and mental well-being and support of students.

F2.5 The Centre ensures homestay families are informed of their legal obligations in relation to duty of care for minors, via face-to-face training and networking which supports the sharing of information and best practice.

F2.6 Students have opportunities to engage in social activities outside of school hours, organised by the Centre or homestay provider.

F2.7 The Centre maintains a review process that confirms and records that homestay arrangements are consistent with literature and accommodation provider claims.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE F3: The ELT Centre supports effective welfare arrangements for all students.

F3.1 Legislative and contractual obligations of all guardians/carers are identified in a signed contract with their responsibilities and accountability clearly identified.

F3.2 Up to date contact details of parents and guardians/carers are readily accessible to relevant Centre staff.

F3.3 Where the Centre has accepted Care Accommodation and Welfare responsibility, a carer nominated by the student’s family is subject to the same conditions and expectations as a homestay family.

F3.4 Where a student lives with relative(s) the Centre ensures that they have relevant information to support the student to adjust to living and studying in this country.

F3.5 There is regular, documented communication with parents and guardians/carers regarding the student’s progress, well-being and welfare.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE F4: The ELT Centre ensures a safe and secure environment.

F4.1 All staff employed on-site have current child protection screening required by the relevant jurisdiction, and visitors without screening clearance are monitored while on the premises.

F4.2 Effective arrangements are in place to prevent unauthorised persons from entering the premises.

F4.3 Students are supervised at all times while on the premises.

F4.4 Where students are brought to and from school by private transport, there is a designated drop-off and pick-up point.

F4.5 Students aged under 16 are not placed in classes with adults.

F4.6 Written and/or secure digital permission is obtained from parents/ guardians/ carers for all off-site activities.

F4.7 The Centre provides a 24 hour emergency contact.

F4.8 Attendance is closely monitored and appropriate action is taken within 60 minutes if a student does not arrive or is absent from class.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE F5: Staff, accommodation providers and guardians/carers are provided with information and training to support the welfare and wellbeing of students.

F5.1 Staff, accommodation providers and guardians/carers are aware of and abide by mandatory reporting requirements and legislation relating to the care of minors.

F5.2 Ongoing information and networking opportunities are provided to ensure that homestay providers are conversant with the physical and emotional needs of adolescents.

F5.3 The ELT Centre’s comprehensive policies and procedures ensuring the safety and wellbeing of students within the Centre and on excursions are incorporated into induction and training for staff and homestay providers.

F5.4 16- and 17-year old students placed in classes for adults are clearly identified to staff.

F5.5 A designated support person within the school has responsibility for monitoring the well-being and welfare of each student on a weekly basis.

F5.6 Arrangements are in place to ensure the services of a registered child/adolescent psychologist are available if needed.

Area F notes

Additional Homestay and Accommodation notes

QUALITY AREA G: STRATEGY, RISK AND GOVERNANCE

KEY TERMS:

  • “Governing body” refers to the group or individual responsible for the Centre’s governance, depending on the type of organisation, e.g. board, executive management committee, owner operator.
  • “Stakeholders” may include, but are not limited to, staff, students and their families, referring agents, accommodation providers, organisation to which the Centre belongs (e.g. university, diocese), shareholders, government.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE G1: The Centre has an effective system of strategic and business planning.

G1.1 The Centre articulates its corporate vision and goals in a published statement.

G1.2 The Centre’s statement of its vision and goals informs a rolling strategic plan which is published at intervals of three to five years.

G1.3 The Centre’s operations are supported by an annual business plan which is clearly linked to the strategic plan.

G1.4 Two-way interaction with staff and other stakeholders informs the development and review of both strategic and business plans.

G1.5 Processes are in place to ensure regular and timely reporting against both strategic and business plans.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE G2: The Centre has an effective and transparent organisational structure and system of reporting.

G2.1 Information about the Centre’s governance structure and policies is readily available.

G2.2 There is an induction and development system for members of the governing body.

G2.3 The organisation has documented reporting lines, with clearly identified responsibilities for all positions.

G2.4 Requirements (e.g. qualifications, skills, performance) for all positions support the Centre’s desired organisational culture.

G2.5 There is a process in place for determining appropriate remuneration.

G2.6 The Centre has an established system of internal and external audits, both financial and operational, with documented follow-up by management.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE G3: Robust financial systems are in place.

G3.1 The Centre has a delegated independent officer and/or committee which meets regularly and includes a qualified accountant or financial professional with accounting experience.

G3.2 The delegated officer or committee is responsible for reviewing internal and external audit reports, risk assessments, budget, staffing and organisational structure.

G3.3 The delegated officer or committee has full and timely access to all relevant information and staff.

G3.4 Delegations for approving expenditure are documented, regularly reviewed and clear to all staff.

G3.5 Financial reports are signed off by the CEO and CFO, or equivalent.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE G4: The Centre has a comprehensive and documented risk management program.

G4.1 Risk management is embedded into governance processes and is clearly linked to strategic and business planning.

G4.2 The risk appetite for the Centre is set by the governing body and documented in a formal statement.

G4.3 Operational risks are managed and documented through internal control systems.

G4.4 Documented crisis management and business continuity plans support the Centre in facing emergencies and unforeseen circumstances.

G4.5 A common risk vocabulary promotes a culture where everyone accepts responsibility for identifying and managing risk.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE G5: An ethical framework supports the Centre’s organisational culture.

G5.1 The Centre’s culture and ethics are articulated in a publicly available code of conduct which is signed by all staff annually.

G5.2 The Centre’s legal and regulatory obligations are documented in a compliance management policy, with established processes for monitoring compliance and addressing breaches.

G5.3 A fraud and corruption control framework stipulates internal reporting mechanisms and informs regular risk assessments.

G5.4 A diversity policy identifies areas of diversity applicable to staffing and ELT delivery.

G5.5 A sustainability policy informs actions and strategies to improve the sustainability performance of the Centre, its partners and suppliers.

G5.6 Awareness training in all areas of the Centre’s ethical framework is provided annually to the Centre’s management, staff and partners.

G5.7 Policies are monitored and regularly updated, with feedback sought from relevant stakeholders.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE G6: The Centre makes clear its commitment to Work Health and Safety.

G6.1 A formal WHS compliance and monitoring program ensures legal compliance, and identifies hazards and minimises risk.

G6.2 Members of the governing body maintain up to date knowledge of WHS and exercise due diligence through verifying implementation of policies.

G6.3 There are established processes for receiving and responding promptly to information about risks and incidents, maintaining records and documenting follow-up action.

G6.4 There are processes in place to keep WHS knowledge up to date throughout the Centre through provision of information, training and supervision.

G6.5 Policy and procedures are in place to prevent violence, aggression and bullying in the workplace, with designated responsibilities for receiving and responding to complaints.

G6.6 The effectiveness of WHS policy and procedures is regularly monitored.

Area G notes

QUALITY AREA H: ONLINE DELIVERY

NOTE:

  • Quality Area H – Online Learning Delivery should be read in conjunction with Quality Area A – Teaching, Learning and Assessment.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE H1: The online environment is designed to support a positive and engaging user experience.

H1.1 Navigation is intuitive, logically sequenced and signposted.

H1.2 Visual design and layout is consistent and aesthetically pleasing throughout.

H1.3 Courses conform to accessibility standards.

H1.4 The teacher maintains an online presence through regularly posting updates and announcements.

H1.5 There is a single location for announcements, news and events.

H1.6 To maintain learner motivation, a range of learning tools is employed in the design process.

H1.7 There is a forum where students and teachers can post comments, questions and responses.

H1.8 There is provision for teacher interaction with individual students.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE H2: Learning and assessment strategies are appropriate to online delivery.

H2.1 Courses provide variety in learning and assessment tasks and technologies.

H2.2 Instructional language is appropriate to the proficiency of the learner.

H2.3 Content is selected to ensure inclusivity.

H2.4 Oral skills development is supported through the use of real time face-to-face video interaction.

H2.5 Written and audio-visual input is presented in amounts which take account of cognitive load.

H2.6 Content is linked to formative assessment activities with automated feedback.

H2.7 Learning and assessment tasks are designed to facilitate active and collaborative learning.

H2.8 Self- and peer-assessment activities are supported by templates and rubrics.

H2.9 Transparency in assessment is supported by the use of common templates and rubrics throughout, for both formative and summative assessment.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE H3: Learning resources and technology support and facilitate learning.

H3.1 Online courses work across all devices and operating systems commonly used by students.

H3.2 Students have the necessary technical skills and technology to complete tasks.

H3.3 The introduction of new technologies is appropriately scaffolded.

H3.4 There are opportunities for students with more advanced digital literacy skills to demonstrate them.

H3.5 All course related activities are accommodated by a single sign on process.

H3.6 There is a designated officer or help desk with responsibility and appropriate resourcing for course maintenance and troubleshooting.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE H4: Courses are supported by an integrated reporting system.

H4.1 There are explicit orientation and socialisation activities, with introductions to the course, the teaching team and key staff.

H4.2 Students are given clear information and explicit instructions as to the amount and timing of participation required of them.

H4.3 Instructor response time is clearly stated.

H4.4 Standards and guidelines for online interaction (netiquette) are made explicit.

H4.5 There are links to relevant support services offered by the provider.

Area H notes

QUALITY AREA I: ELT QUALIFICATIONS

KEY TERMS:

  • “Course” refers to the whole program of study, whether the provider offers this as a single course or as a number of discrete units comprising a qualification.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE I1: Course design supports quality learning outcomes.

I1.1 Courses are designed to prepare students for a professional career in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

I1.2 Course design is informed by developments in TESOL methodology and technology.

I1.3 Courses include no less than 100 contact hours, or the equivalent in Distance Education programs.

I1.4 Courses have specific objectives which are achieved through detailed learning outcomes and align with the relevant AQF level.

I1.5 Appropriate validation of assessment instruments ensures that assessment is valid, reliable, fair and flexible.

I1.6 Appropriate assessment moderation ensures consistency of assessment judgement.

I1.7 Curriculum documents provide effective guidance for teachers, in lesson and assessment planning and delivery, to meet course objectives.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE I2: Teaching staff have appropriate qualifications and experience for courses they deliver and assess.

I2.1 Teaching/tutoring/lecturing staff have:

  • appropriate qualifications as stipulated by the regulating authority
  • qualifications in TESOL or applied linguistics at least one level higher than is awarded for the course of study (or for post-graduate courses, equivalent relevant academic or professional expertise)
  • knowledge of contemporary developments in TESOL
  • skills in contemporary TESOL teaching, learning and assessment principles

I2.2 Teaching staff plan lessons and activities appropriate to the course objectives and the needs of students.

I2.3 Teaching strategies foster progressive and coherent achievement of learning outcomes.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE I3: The TESOL program includes a suitable practical component.

I3.1 The practical component includes at least six hours of face-to-face teaching English to speakers of other languages in a classroom context.

I3.2 The practice teaching is delivered in an authentic English language teaching context to actual learners of English.

I3.3 The practical component is supervised and assessed by a teacher who is qualified as per I2.1 above.

I3.4 The practical component is quality assured, including assurance of the quality of supervision and assessment.

I3.5 Practical arrangements are supported by a detailed written agreement between relevant parties.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE I4: Evaluation of courses is regular and rigorous.

I4.1 Periodic comprehensive course reviews are informed and supported by regular interim monitoring and include external referencing or other benchmarking activities.

I4.2 Analysis of retention rates and student achievement informs course review and the frequency of the review cycle.

I4.3 Assessment validation and moderation outcomes contribute to the course review process.

I4.4 Teaching records are retained for purposes of verification, program coordination and course review.

I4.5 Student feedback on their educational experience contributes to the quality review and improvement cycle.

I4.6 Teaching staff have opportunities to review feedback on their teaching.

I4.7 Feedback from teaching staff and other relevant stakeholders contributes to the quality review and improvement cycle.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE I5: Assessment of prior learning is conducted in an appropriate and ethical manner.

I5.1 Prior learning is assessed in accordance with transparent institutional policies and procedures.

I5.2 Recognition of prior learning (RPL) processes are designed to ensure that the integrity of the course is maintained.

I5.3 RPL processes comply with the assessment requirements of the course.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE I6: Centre facilities are fit for purpose and reflect a professional institution.

I6.1 The physical, virtual or blended learning environment supports academic interaction between students.

I6.2 Provider facilities accommodate the numbers of students who use them.

I6.3 Students have access to a suitable range of resources relevant to TESOL theory, teaching and learning.

I6.4 Resources are regularly monitored and updated to reflect industry best practice.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE I7: Students are provided with necessary course information and learning support.

I7.1 Sufficient and accurate information about the course and the course provider is accessible to enable prospective students to make an informed decision about enrolling in the course.

I7.2 Information provided to students upon enrolment is comprehensive and acccurate.

I7.3 Individual student needs are identified and appropriate access to educational and support services is provided.

I7.4 Students are provided with timely and appropriate feedback that assists in their achievement of learning outcomes.

I7.5 Students have access to teaching staff to discuss their course progress and/or other course-related matters.

I7.6 Complaint handling demonstrates a transparent commitment to resolving problems and improving relationships, programs and services.

Area I notes

QUALITY AREA J: EDUCATION AGENTS

QUALITY PRINCIPLE J.1: An ethical framework underpins the practices of the agency and its counsellors.

J1.1 The agency has robust procedures for ensuring the recruitment of bona fide students that satisfy genuine student or genuine temporary entrant criteria.

J1.2 The agency and its counsellors demonstrate commitment to observing and complying with applicable laws, regulations, codes of conduct and other industry best practice frameworks.

J1.3 Conflicts of interest are declared and appropriate action taken to ensure transparency.

J1.4 Confidentiality is exercised regarding sensitive information obtained from stakeholders.

J1.5 Counsellors exhibit professionalism and integrity, and clients are treated fairly and with due care.

J1.6 The agency has appropriate procedures in place to fulfil legal requirements and protect the welfare of clients under the age of 18.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE J.2: Information provided to stakeholders is ethical, accurate and consistent.

J2.1 Information provided to clients about institutions and their services and facilities is accurate, current and tailored to individual needs.

J2.2 Mechanisms are in place to facilitate regular review of information provided to clients which reflect a proactive approach to ensuring the accuracy and currency of information.

J2.3 The agency systematically verifies the authenticity of documentation it sends to institutions on behalf of its clients.

J2.4 Clients are informed of their rights and responsibilities regarding the conditions of their enrolment.

J2.5 Documentation on fees and a refund policy are clearly articulated and readily available.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE J.3: The agency is supported by effective and transparent governance structures.

J3.1 The agency has an effective system of strategic and business planning.

J3.2 The governance structure effectively supports the goals of the agency.

J3.3 Information about the ownership, governance and organisational structure of the agency is made clear and publicly available.

J3.4 Members of the governing body are suitably experienced and sufficiently competent of carrying out their responsibilities with due diligence.

J3.5 All partners, affiliates and third-party agreements of the agency are disclosed, and there is a process in place to ensure third parties act ethically, honestly and in the best interest of their clients.

QUALITY PRINCIPAL J.4: Management support a performance and development culture for counsellors and staff.

J4.1 Managers comprise the necessary knowledge skills and experience to provide effective leadership.

J4.2 All counsellors have completed a suitable agent training program and are suitably qualified and experienced to provide a high level of service and support to clients.

J4.3 The agency utilises effective systems for communicating with counsellors to ensure they remain up to date with policies and procedures and well informed about the international education industries in which they operate.

J4.4 A formal induction process provides counsellors and staff with essential training and information about the agency and its operations.

J4.5 Performance review and development processes for counsellors and staff provide a structure for fair and supportive performance appraisal aimed at developing and refining practice.

J4.6 Counsellors and staff are supported in working towards their professional development goals through access to opportunities for development.

QUALITY PRINCIPAL J.5: The agency has in place systematic risk management processes.

J5.1 Documented policies and procedures support the agency’s operations.

J5.2 A sound accounting system is utilised to prepare financial statements which portray a true and fair view of the organisation.

J5.3 The agency has a documented, detailed and organisation-wide risk management program.

J5.4 Detailed written agreements underpin the agency’s relationships with all stakeholders, and written agreements are signed and safely stored for a reasonable period.

J5.5 The agency is diligent and forthright in the handling of client fees in accordance with all contractual obligations.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE J.6: Stakeholder feedback is routinely obtained to inform the continuous improvement of services.

J6.1 The agency has mechanisms for obtaining regular feedback from clients and institutions about the quality of services provided, and feedback is reviewed to refine and improve practice.

J6.2 The agency extends opportunities for counsellors to provide feedback on the operations of the agency, and feedback is reviewed to refine and improve operations.

J6.3 Complaints procedures are transparent and accessible to clients.

J6.4 Complaints are reviewed systematically to inform continuous improvement of services.

J6.5 Clients feel that their individual needs, goals and preferences are understood.

QUALITY AREA K: PRODUCTS & SERVICES

QUALITY PRINCIPLE K1: Development of the product or service is underpinned by substantial research.

K1.1 Needs addressed by the product or service are quantified and qualified in initial research and development.

K1.2 Benefits of the product or service to stakeholders are concrete and clearly articulated.

K1.3 Widespread industry and expert consultation contributed to development of the product or service.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE K2: The product or service effectively fulfils its purpose.

K2.1 The product or service provides a complete solution to identified stakeholder needs.

K2.2 Application of the product or service is efficient.

K2.3 The product or service demonstrates equilibrium on a price-quality attribution matrix.

K2.4 Processes are in place to ensure that the product or service retains currency and relevance within the ELT industry.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE K3: Processes are in place to maintain the quality of the product or service.

K3.1 Internal continuous improvement processes contribute to quality control and quality assurance of the product or service.

K3.2 Ongoing review of market alternatives and substitutes takes place and is used to establish a competitive edge.

K3.3 There are formal processes in place for validation of the product or service against identified standards.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE K4: The product or service demonstrates unique elements and innovation.

K4.1 The product or service development strategy captures and harnesses creative concepts.

K4.2 Feedback from key stakeholders is integrated into the product or service development and review process.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE K5: The product or service contributes to the advancement of education, specifically English language teaching and cultural development in the community.

K5.1 Benefits to identified community groups are clearly articulated.

K5.2 The product or service contributes to empowering knowledge partnerships within the global ELT community.

QUALITY AREA L: ELT PROFESSIONALS

QUALITY PRINCIPLE L1: The professional’s occupation and or interests are significantly exposed to the ELT Sector.

L1.1 The professional has a public identity and is linked to the ELT Sector through a Professional Networking platform, such as LinkedIn.

L1.2 The professional has a clear and current curriculum vitae.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE L2: The professional is of good character and demonstrates the appropriate competence and integrity in fulfilling professional responsibilities.

L2.1 NEAS’ Fit and Proper Person requirements are met.

L2.2 The professional is supported by positive professional references.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE L3: The professional is committed to working towards their professional goals through accessing opportunities for development.

L3.1 The professional engages with NEAS Professional Development on an annual basis.

L3.2 The professional completes and keeps a record of relevant Professional Development for their occupation and/or professional goals each year.

QUALITY PRINCIPLE L4: The professional actively supports NEAS’ charitable purposes.

L4.1 The professional maintains professional and ethical interaction with others.

L4.2 The professional’s actions contribute to the advancement of education, specifically English language teaching and cultural development in the community.

Area L notes

NOTES

A1.3 Each course has specific objectives which are achieved through detailed learning outcomes.

In framing course objectives and developing learning outcomes, NEAS strongly recommends referring to a recognised language framework, such as the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR), International Second Language Proficiency Rating Scale (ISLPR), ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines and the Canadian Language Benchmarks.

Further work in relation to the CEFR has resulted in the creation of the ALTE ‘Can Do’ Statements, “a set of performance related scales describing what learners can actually do in the foreign language”, and the Pearson Global Scale of English, “a granular scale with related objectives, materials and assessments that … align to the CEFR”.

In developing course objectives and learning outcomes using a language framework, it is important to drill down into that framework and to select and/or adapt to address the needs and context of the students for whom the course is being designed.

NB: It is essential to check on any restrictions on the use of such frameworks.

A2.1 Teachers hold the following minimum qualifications:

  1. a recognised degree of equivalent
  2. a recognised TESOL qualification

Recognised qualifications

1. A degree or equivalent is at least three years full-time (or its part-time equivalent) in length.

2. A recognised TESOL qualification results from a program of study having at least the following characteristics:

• No less than 100 contact hours, or the equivalent in Distance Education programs, with a content focus on English language, language learning, TESOL teaching

• A practical component including at least six hours face to face practice teaching in TESOL supervised and assessed by a teacher who is qualified as per these requirements

• Is a recognised qualification delivered by an education provider registered with government as being eligible to deliver nationally recognised qualifications

3. A recognised TESOL qualification includes

• Teaching qualification with TESOL method

• Degree in education or teaching with TESOL method

A2.2 Teachers are allocated to levels and courses based on their experience and training.

Specialist knowledge, training and/or experience may be relevant to ESP, EAP and high school preparation courses.

A3 Students are enrolled in courses and levels that reflect their language proficiency and learning goals.

See Note A1.3. NEAS strongly recommends referring to a recognised language framework in developing course learning outcomes. The same framework would then inform placement and proficiency testing.

delivery, assessment and teaching approaches optimise outcomes for students.

a) Class sizes should be appropriate to the course and student profile:

• The student : teacher ratio for classroom based instruction should support the achievement of learning outcomes through a balanced and appropriate blend of delivery modes, bearing in mind factors such as student needs, goals, age group, life experience.

• Delivery modes might include 1:1, small group, tutorial and/or lecture style, as well as additional self-access.

b) Students have access to formal documentation of:

• course objectives

• anticipated learning outcomes

• workload requirements

• standardised/comparable assessment rubrics

• regular progress reports

• end-of-course documentation indicating achievement of learning outcomes

A6 Evaluation of courses is regular and rigorous.

See Note A1.3. Where course objectives and learning outcomes have been developed with reference to a recognised language framework, the course evaluation and review process should include consideration of how it has been interpreted in the course design.

Area B notes

B2 Students have the information and support needed to adjust to living and studying in this country.

Standard 6 of the National Code of Practice 2018 gives details of information and support which must be provided to students. C4 The Centre has resources for each course to meet a range of student learning needs, styles and preferences.

Resources include:

  • educational equipment
  • books and other printed materials
  • audio-visual materials
  • software
  • on-line resources

Area D notes

D1.4 All aspects of the Centre’s operations are supported by documented policies with clearly articulated procedures to facilitate their implementation.

Clearly written and readily accessible policy and procedure documents are basic to ensuring consistency and accountability within an organisation. They also enable the organisation to adapt to meet legislative changes and new commercial environments.

Policies are concise statements of the principles underpinning the Centre’s operations and may also be framed to meet legislative and regulatory requirements.

Procedures describe how each policy will be put into action. A procedure should identify:

Sequential steps required
• Associated documents required (e.g. forms, templates)

Procedures need to be reviewed regularly, and particularly in response to changes in the external environment (e.g. legislation, changing markets) and the introduction of new processes (e.g. new technology).

The senior leadership team holds the following minimum qualifications and experience.

Recognised qualifications

  1. A degree or equivalent is at least three years full-time (or its part-time equivalent) in length.
  2. A degree in education or teaching with TESOL method fulfils TESOL qualification requirements.
  3. A postgraduate qualification is one which generally has an undergraduate degree or equivalent as a prerequisite.

Patterns of qualifications other than those outlined above may also be acceptable.

Area F notes

F1.3 Comprehensive and Centre specific information about living and studying in Australia.

Information about living and studying in Australia would include, but is not limited to the following. For details of information which must be provided to students, refer to the National Code of Practice 2018, Standard 6.

  • rules, regulations and expectations of the Centre
  • homestay/boarding conditions, expectations and responsibilities
  • climate and appropriate clothing
  • local hazards, e.g. beach safety, traffic
  • emergency services; 000 and emergency contact numbers
  • Australian laws relating to under 18 year olds
  • on arrival arrangements

F3 The ELT Centre supports effective welfare arrangements for all students.

The Centre’s requirements and expectations for support of students may include extra-curricular and weekend activities.

F5.3 The ELT Centre’s policies and procedures.

Policies and procedures documentation would include, but not be limited to:

  • bullying and cyberbullying
  • complaints and grievances
  • critical incidents and record management of same
  • excursion planning, organisation and supervision
  • first aid and mental health awareness and management
  • privacy and confidentiality
  • students’ rights and responsibilities
  • use of computers and access to online material

Area G notes

G1 The Centre has an effective system of strategic and business planning.

Strategic and business plans are signed off by the CEO and governing body.

G2 The Centre has an effective and transparent organisational structure and system of reporting.

  • and committees, their roles, responsibilities, frequency of meetings and quorum for each.
  • and the majority of its members are independent of management.
  • as compliance, risk, legal matters, health and safety, finance and audit. Where the size of an organisation does not support a committee structure, responsibility for such areas is clearly defined.

G2.3 The organisation has documented reporting lines, with clearly identified responsibilities for all positions.

“Positions” may include governing body, management and staff (administrative, marketing and teaching).

G3 Robust financial systems are in place.

Effective accounting software is in use.

G3.1 The Centre has a delegated independent officer and/or committee which meets regularly and includes a qualified accountant or financial professional with accounting experience.

  • committee.
  • Centre’s auditor to be invited to attend meetings of the committee.

G4 The Centre has a comprehensive and documented risk management program.

  • risk assessment templates and risk registers. Risk templates or matrices reflect the Centre’s common risk vocabulary.

G5 An ethical framework supports the Centre’s organisational culture.

G5.6 Awareness training in all areas of the Centre’s ethical framework is provided annually to the Centre’s management, staff and partners.

Awareness training includes on-line access, especially for training updates. On-line training can facilitate the recording of staff engagement.

G5.7 Policies are monitored and regularly updated, with feedback sought from relevant stakeholders.

Monitoring of the Centre’s ethical framework includes seeking feedback from staff on management’s implementation of policy.

G6 The Centre makes clear its commitment to Work Health and Safety.

Processes to ensure legal and regulatory compliance include regular workplace inspections and identified emergency contacts. Processes are developed in consultation with workers and designated Health and Safety representatives.

There is regular consideration of WHS (e.g. at governing body and management meetings) along with formal reviews at intervals relevant to specific risk levels.

G6.4 There are processes in place to keep WHS knowledge up to date throughout the Centre through provision of information, training and supervision.

Information and training include induction and mentoring for staff new to a position, and emergency evacuation practice.

G6.5 Policy and procedures are in place to prevent violence, aggression and bullying in the workplace, with designated responsibilities for receiving and responding to complaints.

Where aggression and bullying may be an issue, workplace relationships are monitored.

G6.6 The effectiveness of WHS policy and procedures is regularly monitored.

Monitoring includes periodic review of systems of work, staffing levels, roles and responsibilities. Monitoring strategies include analysis of data, stakeholder feedback, input from staff representatives and/or WHS Committee.

Area H notes

H1.2 Visual design and layout is consistent and aesthetically pleasing throughout.

A style guide has been used to ensure consistency, with expertise in graphic design informing layout and readability. Font, font size and colour contrasts support readability. There is effective use of images, colour and space.

H1.3 Courses conform to accessibility standards.

A link to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 can be found at https://www.australia.gov.au/accessibility.

H2.1 Courses provide variety in learning and assessment tasks and technologies.

Variety in both tasks and technologies is important to maintain student motivation and engagement.

H2.4 Oral skills development is supported through the use of real time face-to-face video interaction

Alternatively, actual face-to-face interation could supplement online delivery in a mixed-mode model.

H2.5 Written and audio-visual input is presented in amounts which take account of cognitive load.

Large blocks of written or oral text are broken down into manageable units of text, suitable to the language level of students.

H3.1 Online courses work across all devices and operating systems commonly used by students.

During the course development phase, research and piloting are important to ensure that courses are accessible to all intended student cohorts. The required technology should be readily accessible and extensively compatible. Courses should be accessible on different devices and mobile responsive so that screen size adjusts automatically. Students should be able to undertake all course learning and assessment activities on all devices.

H3.4 There are opportunities for students with more advanced digital literacy skills to demonstrate them.

Students with well developed digital literacy skills are more likely to maintain motivation if the course does not restrict them to a more basic level.

H4.1 There are explict orientation and socialisation activities, with introductions to the course, the teaching team and key staff.

Orientation information might include:

H4.5 There are links to relevant support services offered by the provider.

Relevant support services might include:

  • welcome from the teacher
  • instructions on how to navigate the learning environment
  • introduction to and contact details of all relevant staff
  • introduction to fellow students

Area I notes

I1.4 Courses have specific objectives which are achieved through detailed learning outcomes and align with the relevant AQF level.

Where a course is offered outside of Australia, it aligns with the relevant qualifications framework in that country. If there is no such framework, it is mapped to the most appropriate AQF level at Certificate IV or above.

I1.5 Appropriate validation of assessment instruments ensures that assessment is valid, reliable, fair and flexible.

Information about assessment validation processes can be found in the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015 and on the NEAS website.

I2.1 Appropriate qualifications as stipulated by the regulating authority.

The regulating authority will generally be a government or designated authority in the relevant jurisdiction. In the case of a course which is offered internationally, such as the CELTA, it may also refer to the course owner. Both the course and the provider must be government registered.

I3 The TESOL program includes a suitable practical component.

A suitable practical component involves classroom teaching. It does not include individual tutoring or activities such as “peer” teaching or fellow students or Skype instruction.

I6.3 Students have access to a suitable range of resources relevant to TESOL theory, teaching and learning.

Resources include:

  • educational equipment
  • books and other printed materials
  • audio-visual materials
  • software
  • online resources

NOTES ON CARE, ACCOMMODATION AND WELFARE

1 Homestay requirements

Homestay is defined as supported and supervised in-home accommodation offered for the purpose of housing international student(s).

1.1 Accommodation standards

• The student has sole use of a secure, private bedroom with:

– storage space for clothes, personal effects and study materials

– desk, chair and adequate lighting for study purposes

– means of heating and/or cooling relevant to local climate

• Two students of the same sex may share a room at the parents’ request but a student may not share a room with a member of the host family

• The home is clean and appropriately furnished and resourced for a family and students, including wifi access

• The student has access to a lockable shared or private bathroom and toilet

• The student has access to shared areas of the home including kitchen, living areas, laundry

• The student has a key (or password etc) to access the homestay

• The nominated homestay host is an Australian citizen or permanent resident aged 25 or older

• A minimum three meals per day are provided, including food being available for the student to make a light lunch and an after school snack (although students may elect to purchase lunch independently).

• The appropriateness of all forms of student accommodation is verified prior to accommodation being approved and then at least every six months.

1.2 Responsibilities of the Centre’s homestay officer or homestay provider company

• Ensure that all adults with whom the student comes into regular contact in the accommodation have current child protection screening relevant to the jurisdiction.

• Visit the homestay prior to placement of students and then at least once a year to check that the environment is suitable and that the homestay complies with the accommodation standards above and requirements of the Centre.

• Require that host families have appropriate insurance policy cover for hosting students.

• Provide comprehensive initial and regular training (at least annually) for host families to ensure understanding of responsibilities and familiarity with best practice.

• Provide a 24-hour emergency number for all stakeholders and ensure that students have all the information they need in order to use this number in emergency situations or cases of abuse.

• Where the carer is not resident in the homestay, ensure that both parties are aware of their roles in relation to the student and have up to date contact details for each other.

• Maintain regular contact with host families, students and school staff as required.

• Ensure that the homestay is within reasonable travelling time from the Centre and that convenient transport is available.

• Ensure that no more than three students are placed in the same homestay and that a minor is not placed in a homestay with an adult student unless the latter has current child protection screening relevant to the jurisdiction.

• Inform the host family in advance of the student’s arrival of placement dates, any special requirements or relevant medical details.

• Ensure that the homestay meets any special requirements of the student, e.g. dietary, religious, gender, pets.

• Publish clear information on homestay standards, requirements and procedures, including conditions and procedures for terminating homestay arrangements and transferring students.

• Support host families with conflict resolution procedures to resolve issues that may arise.

1.3 Responsibilities of host family

• Provide a safe and friendly family environment in which the student is included in family activities.

• Support the student’s language development through regular conversation, in English.

• Support the student to complete homework in a timely manner.

• Provide the student with an orientation to the home, including:

– Security and safety within the home

– Use of appliances and facilities

– Family rules including household tasks and the use of shared facilities

– Meal times, and weekday and weekend curfew times

– Visitors

• Provide the student with an orientation to the local area including public transport, shops, banks, recreation areas, any local hazards.

• Ensure the student is aware of 000 and 24-hour emergency numbers, and Australian laws relating to under 18 year olds.

• Ensure the student is appropriately supervised at all times outside of school hours, including social activities.

• Obtain written and/or secure digital permission from the parent, guardian or carer for the student to be absent from the residence, e.g. sleepover with classmate, holiday with host family.

• Refuse permission for the student to ride in cars driven by provisional licence holders (i.e. P plates) unless prior written approval is provided by their parent.

• Assist the student in making and attending appointments with medical, dental and other service providers.

• Attend meetings and interviews with Centre staff and with homestay coordinator as required.

• Notify the Centre at the beginning of the day if the student is to be absent.

• Notify the Centre immediately if the student indicates an intention to move or does not comply with supervision requirements, or if there are any concerns regarding the student’s health, welfare or progress.

• Ensure that the homestay coordinator, Centre and student’s family have up to date host family contact details at all times.

• Notify the homestay coordinator at least four weeks beforehand (or as soon as possible in case of emergency) of any changes which might impact on the student’s placement including but not limited to:

proposed change of address

– changes to the residence which prevent the host meeting the accommodation standards listed above

– changes to the household occupants of the homestay residence

– temporary inability to provide accommodation or suitable supervision, e.g. holidays, emergency

2. Guardians and carers

Guardian refers to the legal guardian of, or the person holding a guardian visa in relation to, a student aged under 18.

A carer is defined as an adult who undertakes responsibility for the welfare of an international student aged under 18.

A carer:

• Is an Australian Citizen or permanent resident aged 25 or older.

• Has current child protection screening relevant to the jurisdiction.

• Contracts with the Centre to provide support for the student and supervise the student’s welfare for the nominated period of the student’s course of study.

• Ideally, is also the accommodation provider with whom the student resides.

Responsibilities of the guardian or carer

• Provide care and support for the students and assist the students to settle into life and study in the Centre.

• Maintain close contact with the student, the Centre and, if not residing with the student, with the accommodation provider.

• Ensure that the homestay coordinator, Centre and student’s family have up to date contact details at all times.

• Notify the Centre at least four weeks beforehand (or as soon as possible in case of emergency) if s/he wishes to travel to another location, so that alternative appropriate arrangements can be made for the welfare of the student during the period of absence.

3. Related documents

Documents relating to the welfare of students aged under 18 will be reviewed in connection with the Annual Return of information. At the Quality Review visit, evidence will be sought that relevant documents have been issued and/or utilised.

3.1 Pre-arrival

• Information provided to education agents making clear:

– The legal requirements, contractual obligations and service expectations regarding the transport of minors

– Support which agents are required to provide for students and parents

• Contract with provider of airport meeting service if this is outsourced

• Information about living and studying in Australia, which is provided to students, agents, parents and guardians/carers

proposed change of address

– changes to the residence which prevent the host meeting the accommodation standards listed above

– changes to the household occupants of the homestay residence

– temporary inability to provide accommodation or suitable supervision, e.g. holidays, emergency

2. Guardians and carers

Guardian refers to the legal guardian of, or the person holding a guardian visa in relation to, a student aged under 18.

A carer is defined as an adult who undertakes responsibility for the welfare of an international student aged under 18.

A carer:

• Is an Australian Citizen or permanent resident aged 25 or older.

• Has current child protection screening relevant to the jurisdiction.

• Contracts with the Centre to provide support for the student and supervise the student’s welfare for the nominated period of the student’s course of study.

• Ideally, is also the accommodation provider with whom the student resides.

Responsibilities of the guardian or carer

• Provide care and support for the students and assist the students to settle into life and study in the Centre.

• Maintain close contact with the student, the Centre and, if not residing with the student, with the accommodation provider.

• Ensure that the homestay coordinator, Centre and student’s family have up to date contact details at all times.

• Notify the Centre at least four weeks beforehand (or as soon as possible in case of emergency) if s/he wishes to travel to another location, so that alternative appropriate arrangements can be made for the welfare of the student during the period of absence.

3. Related documents

Documents relating to the welfare of students aged under 18 will be reviewed in connection with the Annual Return of information. At the Quality Review visit, evidence will be sought that relevant documents have been issued and/or utilised.

3.1 Pre-arrival

• Information provided to education agents making clear:

– The legal requirements, contractual obligations and service expectations regarding the transport of minors

– Support which agents are required to provide for students and parents

• Contract with provider of airport meeting service if this is outsourced

• Information about living and studying in Australia, which is provided to students, agents, parents and guardians/carers

Accommodation

• Contract with homestay provider company or with individual host family

• Contract with carer

• Policy, procedures and related documents for ensuring that accommodation providers are aware of:

– Legal obligations in relation to the care of minors

– The Centre’s requirements and expectations for support of students

• Policy and procedures for the review of homestay arrangements and/or airport meeting service

3.3 Care of student

• Contract with carer setting out legislative and contractual obligations

• Policy and procedures for regular communication with parents and carers regarding the student’s progress and welfare

• When releasing a student, or accepting a student from another provider, negotiated and documented arrangements are in place to ensure there is no gap in welfare.

3.4 Safety and Security

Policy and procedures ensure the safety and wellbeing of students, including:

• Child protection screening of staff

• Training of staff in relation to mandatory reporting requirements and legislation relating to the care of minors

• Supervision of students and visitors

• Organisation and conduct of excursions including student(s) under the age of 18

• Attendance monitoring

• Bullying and cyberbullying

• Complaints and grievances

• Critical incidents and record management of same

• First aid and mental health awareness and management

• Privacy and confidentiality

• Students’ rights and responsibilities

• Use of computers and access to online material

Note for Quality Area L

Quality Principle L2.1 NEAS’ Fit and Proper requirements are met

The concept of a ‘fit and proper’ person is a fundamental requirement of particular professions or memberships. In such cases, a fit and proper test is applied to an individual where a finite number of requirements must be satisfied before the individual is accepted by the organization.  Although these differ depending on the industry, a ‘fit and proper’ test is essentially applied to determine whether an individual is a responsible person and can be entrusted by an organization to be competent, ethical and trustworthy.

NEAS’ Fit and Proper requirements of individuals include:

  • Meeting Fit and Proper requirements stipulated by the educational regulatory bodies which accredit providers and grant registration rights
  • No criminal convictions
  • No acts of professional or academic misconduct
  • Maintenance of professional and ethical interaction with others
  • Contribution to the advancement of education, specifically English language teaching and cultural development in the community.’

These must be satisfied before Associate Membership is granted.

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